Browsing All Posts filed under »Georgian Schools and Education«

Expectation Vs. Reality

March 14, 2013 by

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My orientation to Georgia took place 5 months ago at the Bazaleti Hotel in Tbilisi. The 108 other new volunteers and I stepped off of a 36 hour travel day at the tender hour of 4 a.m. and after patchy sleep schedules, blood tests, and our first purchases with lari and visuals of the Georgian […]

Of Matriarchs and Men: an interview with a school Director.

March 11, 2013 by

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    An interview with Zanati Public School’s school director and literature teacher, Manana Tediashvili. Georgia is a land of local flavouring, from its villages dotting the sweeping hillsides and rugged mountains right on up to its administrative and governing styles.  As an English teacher attached to a tiny village school, I’ve been repeatedly impressed […]

Song and Dance

March 1, 2013 by

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This is a post about why I open every lesson with a song.* I usually start off my new students with something easy and fun – “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes” is my favorite for this. Everyone stands, everyone says the names of the body parts, and then we sing the song together. We sing […]

Introducing Guy Fawkes: Advice for Putting on a Performance

February 4, 2013 by

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British TLG Volunteer Oliver Rogers spent last semester in Village Zumi, where he wrote and directed a school play that caught the attention of his village and local media. Oliver, or Olly as he prefers to be called, created a play dedicated to the English holiday, ‘Guy Fawkes’ or ‘Bonfire’ night, which is celebrated on […]

Georgian Educational Perspectives

November 21, 2012 by

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One of our missions as foreign volunteers in Georgia is to exchange cultural perspectives, especially on education. Exchange is apparently a two-way street, so when I’m not bloviating about kids these days running in the halls and touching me with their filthy hands I make it a point to listen to, and try to understand, […]

Reflections on the First Week

November 13, 2012 by

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My class size ranges from 4 to 7 children, and while one would think that means classroom management is not a problem, that is not always the case. Fortunately, TLG gave adequate forewarning that Georgian teachers’ methods of maintaining order could be very different than their western counterparts’. Now, rather than being shocked by the […]

The Co-Teacher Experience

October 31, 2012 by

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Stepping into the classroom on my first working day in Georgia was an experience that I had anticipated, but this anticipation did not make the experience any less awkward. There was this classroom full of new students jumping to their feet in order to greet their first foreign English teacher, a classroom full of students […]